The RCI Blog

4 mistakes to avoid when relocating employees

Posted by Staff on Nov 10, 2014 8:34:00 AM

Relocating employees for a new job naturally presents some difficulties. To help make the transition easier on the employee, here are a few mistakes employers should be wary of.

Manhattan skyline and Brooklyn Bridge in New York

1.   Not educating the employee about their new city

People become comfortable with the surroundings they’re used to and the lives they've created for themselves.

Employees may experience mild culture shock when moving to a new city, accompanied by an overwhelming burden to rebuild their safe home environment once again. Seemingly low priority considerations, such as proximity to grocery stores or parking near home, are often overlooked prior to a move, but play a critical role in helping an employee settle in smoothly.

For example, if an employee has pets or kids, it’s important to provide relevant information about vets and schools. Ensuring an employee is well acquainted with their new location will help them stay grounded and remain focused on the job at hand, increasing their job productivity and overall well-being.

2.   Not guiding employee through the relocation process

Most employees do not relocate frequently and are unfamiliar with the process. As an employer, it can be easy to forget that moving is currently the single most important thing happening in an employee’s life. Sometimes they need more help than the company is prepared to give- that's where a Relocation Management Company (RMC) can help. 

Employees should receive counseling on the best way to prepare for a move, including what to expect and what they can do to simplify the process. Relocation policies should always be clearly defined and reimbursement procedures explained to them in detail.

3.   Not communicating with employees

Keeping communication open and transparent helps ease an employee’s stress during a move. The employee will appreciate you taking the time to check in via email or over the phone at least once a week to see if everything is running smoothly.

Dedicate a person at the company to fulfill this position, or if you are working with an RMC, make sure they will take care of it for you. When an employee is shown empathy and concern, it will improve their moving experience.

4.   Providing a limited amount of resources/networks

Relocating is both a financial and emotional burden. Well-designed corporate relocation benefits and policies are designed to ease this burden. Companies can help an employee connect with their new location by providing them with the information they need to make it feel like home. ]

Often times an employee is moving away from their friends and family- help make it easier on them by suggesting opportunities to meet new people based on their interests. An experienced real estate agent can also help an employee choose the right neighborhood based on their specific needs.

 

Topics: Human Resources, Relocation